Dental hygiene

Dental hygiene is the practice of keeping the mouth and the teeth clean to prevent dental problems such as cavities, gum disease, and bad breath. Daily preventative care such as brushing and flossing will greatly enhance the overall health of teeth as well as regularly seeing your dentist or dental hygienist. Maintaining good oral hygiene is one of the most important things you can do for your overall health, breath, and teeth. Daily preventative care will assist in stopping problems that threaten the health of your mouth like gum disease, tooth decay, and cavities. Find out more about what you can do for your dental hygiene.

What causes gum disease?

Gum (periodontal) disease is caused by bacteria. These bacteria, if left along the gumline, will irritate the gums and cause an inflammation reaction. The gums then begin to bleed and swell allowing the bacteria to go deeper under the gumline. If the inflammation is allowed to continue, the bone will begin to demineralize and dissolve. As the bone dissolves around the teeth, the teeth become unsupported and will fall out. Unfortunately, pain does not occur until the final stages of the disease and treatment at that time has very little chance of being successful. If your gums bleed regularly, seek treatment as soon as possible.

Signs Of Periodontal Disease

Whereas gingivitis symptoms such as sore gums and bleeding are bothersome, the early signs of periodontitis include receding gums and the formation of pockets between the gums and the teeth. Once the infection gets beneath your gumline, periodontitis can cause tooth loss and can destroy tissues, ligaments, and bones in the mouth.

How To Treat Periodontal Disease

When gingivitis progresses to periodontitis, treatment becomes much more complicated. Your dentist and hygienist will evaluate you for any boneless and discuss any recommended treatment with you.  

Fluoride

Fluoride is a compound of the element fluorine, which is found universally throughout nature in water, soil, air and in most foods. Fluoride is absorbed easily into the tooth enamel, especially in children’s growing teeth. Once teeth are developed, fluoride makes the entire tooth structure more resistant to decay and promotes remineralization, which aids in repairing early decay before the damage is visible.

Tooth decay, and cavities. Find out more about what you can do for your dental hygiene.

Oral Health

Flossing your teeth is more important to your well-being than even brushing. So why do so many of us find reasons not to do it?

We’ve got excuses, but dentists have simple answers for them all.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (morning and before bed time) and floss at least once a day. Better still, brush after every meal and snack. These activities remove plaque, which if not removed, combines with sugars to form acids that lead to tooth decay. Bacterial plaque also causes gum disease and other periodontal diseases.

The standard recommendation is to visit your dentist twice a year for check-ups and cleanings. Talk with your dentist about the frequency that is best for you.

Don’t be afraid to ask your dentist for more information if you don’t understand a treatment or procedure. You should be able to have a free and frank discussion with your dentist. Here are questions you may want to ask:

  • What are the treatment options for a particular dental condition?
  • How do these options differ in cost and durability?
  • Do all the options solve the problem? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?
  • Of the dental treatments being recommended, which are absolutely necessary, which are less urgent, which are elective, and which are merely cosmetic?
  • What are the consequences of delaying treatment?
  • How much will the treatment cost?
  • When is payment due?
  • What method of payment does your dentist expect?
  • Do you have a clear understanding of all fees and methods and schedules of payment?